Managers have to lead, not manage.

Many executives are called, but do not lead. You manage. Why we can not lump together management and leadership and why we need more leadership.?

The polished yesterday

Managers went to work with a clear mission: “Make the factory run as well today as it did yesterday.” Managers are driven from the past. “They look at the mistakes of yesterday and avoid them for tomorrow,” explains Kapinski, “they improve in the sense of optimizing.” This would make the organization a little bit better. “That’s a good thing,” Kapinski is convinced, “we need a shaky amount of management because otherwise the business model will not work.” But maintaining the status quo is not enough. “I expect an executive to be not just a manager, but a true leader,” said Kapinski. “And that means developing the store.” Strong leadership would stand in the case of the trucks and put a few things on the agenda – things.

Work on the company

Unlike management, leadership looks to the future. “Leadership is disruption. It’s not about developing a Euro 6 diesel that runs a tad better than the Euro Diesel 5, “said Kapinski.” Leadership begins when someone sits down and says, ‘We’re building electric cars now. Self-propelled. “” Leadership does not fix things that go bad, but leadership shakes things that are doing really well – to make them even better. “You’re welcome to be on the road with a joint and see opportunities even hotter than what’s going on,” smiles Kapinski. “Ask yourself the question, ‘What does the customer need – what he does not know yet?'” However, a comprehensive change of the business model from the daily business is difficult. For this one would usually need external impulses. “A bookseller would never have founded Amazon.” Tesla was also not developed by an automobile man, but by someone who had an idea. Leadership does not mean per se to risk the existence of the company. Leadership would also be one size smaller – and begin with putting dearly won processes and habitual behavior to the test. It should and should skip the once set frame of the organization confidently. “However, the manager must always keep an eye on what works and what does not,” said Kapinski. to put dear won processes and habitual behavior to the test. It should and should skip the once set frame of the organization confidently. “However, the manager must always keep an eye on what works and what does not,” said Kapinski. to put dear won processes and habitual behavior to the test. It should and should skip the once set frame of the organization confidently. “However, the manager must always keep an eye on what works and what does not,” said Kapinski.

Above, more leadership

Should one assign a Leader to each manager? “No,” Kapinski reassures. Above all, it is important that companies understand the difference between management and leadership. It is not necessary for different people to be responsible for management and leadership tasks, but rather for the roles held by the respective manager. Every leader must be able to manage and manage both. Kapinski sees three roles in the company: skilled work, management and leadership. Each employee would fill these roles to different degrees. “Above all, the employee does skilled work, with a little management,” explains Kapinski. “At middle management level, responsibility for today is anchored. All three roles are relevant here, with management tasks accounting for the majority. “At the top of the organizational structure is the proportion of true leadership work, supplemented by a small proportion of management tasks. Leadership at this level takes a lot of time – simply because the ship is bigger and there is a lot to think about. Although skilled work does not take place on this level, the executive must nevertheless be familiar with the business model. “The further up in the pyramid, Management needs to be lived more and more, and management executives can not get caught up in management, “says Kapinski. To do so, companies not only have to allow the role of true leadership in the organization, but also value it.

Author :- Olaf Kapinski, IT executive coach and publisher of the “Life Guide Podcast”.

amardeep kaushal

Blogger, Marketer & Data Analyst.

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